Tag Archives: Galina Parfenov

Up Your Game with an Online Climbing Coach

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Thanks to the power of the internet, trainers with years of climbing coaching experience will create a plan just for you. Photo by TrainingBeta.

If you’ve been climbing for a few years, then it’s likely that you have (or soon will) reach a plateau in your climbing ability. Answering the question “How can I improve at climbing?” is a difficult one.

Climbing is a relatively new sport, and theories around training are still being developed. It can seem like everyone you talk to has radically different ideas about what works best, making it hard to sort out the good advice from the bad. Furthermore, a training regimen that works for a certain type of climber, say a boulderer climbing V11, will not work for a sport climber projecting 5.13 or even another boulderer climbing V5. So how do you make sense of it all? A few years ago, your only option was buying a training book and sorting through the theories to design your own plan. However, recently, personal coaches for climbing have been using the Internet as a tool to reach a wider audience.

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Pull-Ups: The DIY Manual

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One of the most commonly asked questions by those who have just gotten into climbing and want to improve is, “How do I work up to doing a pull-up?” Today on Crux Crush, Galina Parfenov, professional climber and climbing trainer shares her step by step manual to working up to doing a pull-up.

This is probably the number one question I get asked by clients, YouTubers, climbing and fitness fanatics alike.  Actually, it’s a question I never considered until recently. I started gymnastics when I was about eight, and prior to that I had spent a majority of my life hanging from and doing pull-ups on a contraption called a Sports Complex. In other words, pull-ups had always been a part of the repertoire, hence I never had to go through the process of learning to do one as an adult.

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How To Train On The Campus Board

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When it comes to training one of the most intimidating tools we can think of is the campus board. We know that this big, imposing board covered in vexing little rungs is an effective training tool, but it can be hard to even know how to begin to use it. So to help us get past our fears, we turn to none other than the fiercely dedicated training machine, Galina Parfenov (and if you haven’t seen this lady in action, check out her training videos to see what we mean). In today’s article, she breaks down the different types of campus board exercises and shows you how to do each one, whether you are just starting out, or already have a campus-board routine and want to freshen it up! Here’s Galina:

Over the years I have gone back and forth between various training techniques and devices—everything from fingerboards, rock rings, systems boards, and even plain old pull-up bars—until finally settling on just one: the campus board. Which, like the lever, screw, pulley, and wedge, is a simple machine, at least where climbing is concerned. Ten rungs. That’s all it takes (just ask their inventor, Wolfgang Güllich, who used the campus board to train for the first ascent of Action Directe, the world’s first 9a!)

That being said, a person who has been climbing for less than two years should not be using a campus board. They shouldn’t really be training, other than maybe a few pull-ups here and there. The first 18-24 months or so should be dedicated solely to climbing and training by climbing, until your tendons can handle the additional pressure of campusing. This also applies to youth.

Here’s a checklist to help you decide if campus rungs are right for you:

  • I have been climbing for at least 18 months.
  • I am at least 16 years old.
  • I have not recently had reoccurring pain in my fingers, elbows, or shoulders.
  • I have plateaued.
  • I want to get STRONG!

Check them all? Then refer to the list of campus board exercises below! I’ve provided modifications for beginner and advanced. If you aren’t sure which you are, start with the beginner exercises and move to advanced if you need more of a challenge.

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