Tag Archives: future of climbing

Climbing in the Year 2030: Climbing Mentality

Photo credit: Royal Robbins

The mental fortitude that Lynn Hill demonstrates could be a focus in the future of climbing. Photo credit: Royal Robbins

Over the last two weeks, climber and author John Burgman, has looked into climbing’s crystal ball and predicted how the sport might change over the next 15 years. Today we go back to the future one last time and take a look at potential changes to climbing mentality. 

In a recent Ask Me Anything on Reddit, Lynn Hill was asked about the mental side of climbing, and she responded with her opinion that focus and mental fortitude don’t come so much from other people, rather they are strengthened within oneself. This was an appropriate answer because for a long time external resources—experts, websites, classes and books—that targeted the mental side of climbing did not exist. As a result, for many climbers, diving into psychological motivations and working on mental toughness for routes—or bouldering problems—long involved a sort of jury-rigged hodgepodge of non-climbing sources forcefully poured into one’s own climbing mold; take a meditation exercise that you learned in a yoga class, combine it with a visualization technique from a self-help podcast, use a little of that anti-anxiety breathing technique that a former roommate taught you, and apply it all to whatever crux is tripping you up at your crag.

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Climbing in the Year 2030: Gear

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Oh, how the times have changed!

Today we’re sharing the third installation of John Burgman’s series “Climbing in the Year 2030”. Last week, we looked at how training may evolve and John predicted what could be in store for climbing gyms of the future. In today’s segment Burgman talks to the experts to speculate on how gear could evolve over the next 15 years. 

If there’s one common denominator in the predictions and speculation of the next 15 years of climbing, it’s specialization. The all-around climber, at least at the elite level, might soon be an extinct breed. In the year 2030, competitive boulderers will boulder and sport climbers will sport climb, with even more separation than there exists now. Gyms will offer isolated training related to specific disciplines, and indoor and outdoor climbing will set off down their divergent paths, heading towards considerably different destinies like teenagers in a breakup.

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Climbing in the Year 2030: Gyms and Facilities

Are climbing gyms the new urban fitness craze? Photo of BKB Chicago by The Chicago Architecture Blog.

Are climbing gyms the new urban fitness craze?

Today we’ve got part 2 of 4 of John Burgman’s series “Climbing in the Year 2030”. In part 1 he took a look at how training may evolve over the next 15 years and in today’s segment he chats with gym owners and training experts to predict what the future holds for climbing gyms and training facilities. 

While there are still those die-hards who view indoor climbing as somehow inferior to the outdoor form of the sport, such opinions seem to be disappearing along with the indoor/outdoor debate itself. It was always ridiculous to try and put the two iterations on some mythical hierarchy because they can coexist just fine alongside each other. You never hear scuba divers chiding swimmers who enjoy doing laps in a pool, right?

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Climbing in the Year 2030: Training

None of these things existed 15 years ago. How will climbing change in the next 15 years?

None of these things existed 15 years ago. How will climbing change in the next 15 years?

Over the next two weeks, we will take a look into the future of climbing in a 4 part series. The sport has changed tremendously since 2000. Guest contributor John Burgman, author of Why We Climb, talked with experts in the climbing field to explore how the sport might progress in the next 15 years.

Take a moment and think back to your climbing life in the year 2000. Perhaps you weren’t climbing at all back then, but if you were, you didn’t post updates about your current project on Twitter or Instagram. If you frequented a gym, it was likely of the beige-walled, cavernous variety, quite a contrast from the complete-fitness optimization palaces of today. The climbing scene, as well, was different 15 years ago. Consider this: Daniel Woods and Alex Puccio were yet to dominate the ABS Nationals because the comp didn’t exist yet. Adam Ondra was only seven years old in 2000. Ashima Shiraishi was…well, she wasn’t; she wouldn’t be born for another year. Evolv shoes wouldn’t be on the market for another two years, and the same goes for the colorful Organic chalk bags and crash pads that are so prevalent at crags today. It’s a safe assumption that back in the year 2000, then-Illinois-Senator Barack Obama and most other non-climbers of the world had never heard of the Dawn Wall, let alone some cockamamie idea of “freeing” it…

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